The top competitors were reasonably close; however, the Patagonia Lightweight Black Hole performed a step above most of the rest for weather resistance. Its 100% ripstop nylon with a (most importantly) TPU-film laminate and a DWR (durable water repellent) finish was weather resistant in both our real-world and our side-by-side testing. Even its water-tight zipper lived up to its name, and even after several minutes of directly spraying it with a garden hose it only let a few drops of water in. Exceeding the waterproof performance of the Patagonia Lightweight Black Hole (and therefore all of the other bags we tested) is the Top Pick Yeti Panga. The Panga replicates river rafting equipment performance and is completely submersible. To the attributes of a river rafting duffel bag, the Yeti adds greater durability and backpack straps. It truly stands out.
Keep in mind that the YETI Panga is overkill for most non-outdoor use. The bag is very pricey at $350, heavy at over 6 pounds for the 75-liter version, and has a thick, rubbery feel. In addition, YETI branding is strong with logos on each side and a very prominent imprint that runs the length of the bottom of the bag. All in all, this isn’t the optimal duffel for the average traveler or for light outdoor use, but it’s hard to beat when you need waterproof protection for your gear (think water sports or protecting important belongings that absolutely cannot get wet). For a cheaper waterproof duffel option, see the SealLine WideMouth below.

I bought a fabulous cross body satchel in dark grey canvas years ago it has flaps and zippered compartments – and plenty of room for a rain jacket – trouble is it is so heavy that by the end of a long day my neck hurts. So last time we went to the US I bought a small shoulder bag I wear it cross body and it has my phone credit card some cash and passports on it. Hubby gets a back pack with my scarf, rain jacket and a water bottle. Best reveal tip – make the husband carry the heavy stuff lol

These recommendations are great! I need a travel bag for my upcoming trip to Italy, so this is super helpful. One travel tip I’ve heard over the years in the same vein that I think is really helpful is when you’re walking with a rolling suitcase to keep it either between you and your travel companion, or if you’re alone to keep the bag on the side of you closest to a wall. This applies to bags as well. That way it’s much harder for someone to swipe it as they go by, especially if they’re on a bike, Vespa, motorcycle, etc.


After using the newer Base Camp model on just a few trips, our testing team unanimously gave the thumbs up to this additional pocket, which added just enough organizational options. The same could be said for the Long Hauler. Other organizational features that our testers appreciated were the dual inner, zippered mesh pockets featured on the Patagonia Black Hole Duffel and Black Hole Wheeled Duffel, Gregory Alpaca, and The North Face Rolling Thunder.

I do not carry an anti-theft bag yet, but I will be looking into it as the only times I’ve had things stolen while travelling are from a backpack! My travel tip is…also to do with bags..but I always chuck in a couple of roll-up nylon shopping bags when I am packing. They are great as dirty washing bags, shoe bags, beach and pool bags or to put your shopping in as a way to reduce the use of plastic shopping bags. My ones hold up to 20kg so they can carry a lot of groceries! And when you have bought too many souvenirs you can also use them as an extra carry-on bag (and I’ve never been charged for it). My favourites are envirosax (Australian) and Loqi. They all have beautiful eye-catching designs too.


A small percentage of people want waterproof protection from their duffel (think rafters, fisherman, and backcountry winter adventurers). The market is limited, but two bags on the list are waterproof: the YETI Panga and SealLine WideMouth. The Panga is a beast of a bag, with the shape of a traditional duffel but with extra thick materials and a fully waterproof zipper. The SealLine, on the other hand, is a roll-top bag that more closely resembles a dry bag. Given their over-built nature, we wouldn’t want a waterproof duffel for anything but the harshest and wettest of environments. They simply are too heavy, expensive, and technically-oriented (minimal organization and straps) for everyday use. And it's worth mentioning that the Arc’teryx Carrier and Hyperlite Dyneema Duffel can also be used for some scenarios in which a waterproof duffel is being considered. They won’t handle submersion, but should be able to keep out rain or snow with similar waterproof fabrics, taped seams, and water-resistant zippers as a rain jacket.
Why a leather duffel bag, you may ask? Well, for starters, this thing is going to last you a long, long time — way longer than any cheap plastic thing you pick up before your last-minute trip out to Montauk. It’s also versatile, an important quality for any investment piece. You’ll be able to bring it on a plane, on a business trip, or to a hunting lodge out in Montana. There’s virtually no place where a leather duffel bag would feel awkward or out of place.
Made with beautiful full grain calfskin leather that has deep color tones and looks better as it ages. The vegetable tanned base creates the rich brown and red colors while the semi gloss finish helps prevent stains. Over time this leather will soften and develop a beautiful patina. Our 8 oz cotton duck canvas lining is made in South Carolina and very durable. The combination of Italian vegetable tanned leather and strong U.S. made canvas lining makes this bag an all time best seller.

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When you are facing a big trip, there are exciting choices to make, and there are dreaded choices to make. We've done the dirty work, narrowing a giant field of over 45 duffel bags to 12 of the best. We then put those top 12 through the paces, dragged on travels of literally every type. Choosing your luggage is often in the "dreaded" category. It really matters, but all the options seem the same while spanning a massive spread of criteria. We assessed each piece, and compared them to one another, in terms of ease of transport, ease of packing, durability, weight, and weather resistance. The overall performance of a piece of adventure luggage is the sum of these, weighted according to general and specific preferences. Our rigorous process identifies six award winners and others that fill niches. None of what we assess here is lousy equipment. Read on to make your choice.

We’ve all been there: clumsily dragging our bag across the airport lobby and cursing ourselves for not purchasing something with wheels. And if you’re looking for a bag in the 60-liter range or larger, know that when it gets full, it’s going to be heavy. The good news is that duffel manufacturers have gotten creative with designing bags that can be carried in a multitude of ways. Below are the main carrying options, and some fully-featured bags offer all four.

how to travel with luxury bags


2. There are several embedded pockets, such that it renders other pockets useless. on the top of the bag, the water proof pocket embeds into another pocket. If you have filled that second pocket, you cannot use the waterproof pocket -- there is no where extra for it to expand. This means I have two pockets, but have to make a decision about which of the two I actually want to use.
Shopping for women’s luggage? You’ve come to the right place. ROXY has a wide selection of travel bags for women in a variety of shapes and sizes so that you can find the ones that fit all of your belongings perfectly. High quality women’s luggage can be hard to find, and ROXY has a great collection of durable, well constructed travel bags for women that won’t break the bank. We believe that you should be able to pack for a new adventure at a moment’s notice without having to worry about whether your suitcase will fit everything you need. At ROXY, we’re often bit by the travel bug, and whether it's a quick weekend getaway or a round the world adventure, we know how important it is to be able to easily take your personal belongings with you. Our women’s luggage is meant to accommodate your travel plans, not the other way around so that you never have to leave anything important behind. So what are you waiting for? Let’s start packing!

Patagonia hit the nail on the head with the name of its line of heavy-duty carry-alls: Black Hole. That’s what a duffel should be — a bottomless pit into which you can toss anything and everything you might need for a day at the crag or an entire week in the opposite hemisphere. The brand recently released a pared-down version of the popular bag — goodbye padded backpack straps and D-shaped zip opening. It’s lighter, but no less durable than its predecessor. The Lightweight Black Hole is made from 7.1-ounce 210-denier nylon ripstop with a TPU-film laminate and a DWR coating. Best of all? It weighs just 510 grams.


Realize the limitations of the Bago Travel Bag. The lightweight construction is not durable. With rough treatment and hard contents, holes could form in the Bago in minutes. We wouldn't hand this duffel off to the airlines or to donkey drivers and we also wish that the Bago had backpack straps. The only reasonable ways to move the Bago are in briefcase mode or over one shoulder. For big loads and longer distances, this isn't ideal. Basically, all the other bags we tested can be backpacked or wheeled longer distances.
Thank you, I have the Travelon cross body bucket bag, I love it and use it every day when traveling, a would be thief was foiled on the Paris metro, as I had clipped the zips closed, and I love the mini light that comes with the bag, helps with finding items at night especially. I rave about this bag to anyone who will listen. My number one travel tip is to wear in the shoes that you plan on taking travelling, don’t keep them ready for the trip, you will smile at the end of every day if you do.
Anyone who has traveled a fair amount knows the value of a good tote. The workhorse of the travel bag ensemble, it’s the perfect carry-all for your essentials. You can toss everything in one roomy bag (we’re talking wallet, passport, phone, headphones, tablet, book, scarf, sweater, toiletry bag, water bottle, snacks — don’t forget the snacks!, and even a travel pillow), grab it, and go.
There are always challenges and unforeseen obstacles that arise when trying to bring a product to life. There are so many moving parts that must be managed. However, with this being our sixth product launch, we can confidently say that we are experienced in this process and have developed systems and processes to mitigate the risks and obstacles that will arise. We will work hard to ensure that we deliver what we promise and to go the extra mile whenever it is possible. Thanks for believing in us!
Priced at $80, the Gregory Stash is an affordable duffel with an attractive design. We’ll start with the Stash’s simple zipper opening that extends the length of the duffel, which is not our preferred closure (U-shaped is better). The zipper does reach the end flaps, however, allowing the main compartment to expand up and out when packing and providing better access than other bags with similarly straight zip closures. You also get generous padding on the straps and a large outside pocket for valuables.
For Ease of Packing: The easiest models to pack and unpack were The North Face Rolling Thunder 30" and 36" models. Both of these duffel bags featured a large opening that still was easy to zip closed when the bag was full. The Patagonia Black Hole Wheeled was also extremely easy to pack up as well as all the more traditional non-wheeled duffels we tested. A rigorous criterion for them to even be selected for non-wheeled models was their ease of packing. Most of the duffels we tested have U-shaped openings. The Patagonia Lightweight Black Hole, Top Pick Yeti Panga, and Top Pick Bago all have straight "I-shaped" zippers and were subsequently harder to load and unload.

I just fell in love with the Travelon backpack, especially in the gray color. My travel tip is to pack everything in a carryon that can fit under the seat 💺 I dread the hustle of snatching and stressing for overhead space. Since I get cold easily, I wear lots of layers on the plane, which means less items to pack in my bag. Plus the bag I have is convertible and can either be a backpack or shoulder bag. It can serve several purposes. In my case, I travel for work so I also use it as my work bag as it fits my 15” laptop
Arc’teryx’s sleek Carrier is not your everyday travel duffel, and it doesn’t look like one either. With taped seams, coated nylon, and a water-tight zipper with storm flap, the Carrier is about as close to waterproof as a water-resistant bag gets. And at only 1 pound 5 ounces for the 55L version (and a mere 1 pound 7 ounces for the 80L), it’s the lightest option on our list, handily beating out ultralight designs like Granite Gear Packable Duffel and the Gregory Stash, and packing down to an impressively small size. 
I have a PacSafe cross body bag. It’s not the most fashionable but I do like it. Locking zippers, wires in strap to prevent slash ‘n grab thieves ,Rfid internal picket, external pocket for water bottle too. I chose this style for the safety features but also, I can put my 35mm DSLR camera inside the bag and not look completely like a tourist at times.
I do not carry an anti-theft bag yet, but I will be looking into it as the only times I’ve had things stolen while travelling are from a backpack! My travel tip is…also to do with bags..but I always chuck in a couple of roll-up nylon shopping bags when I am packing. They are great as dirty washing bags, shoe bags, beach and pool bags or to put your shopping in as a way to reduce the use of plastic shopping bags. My ones hold up to 20kg so they can carry a lot of groceries! And when you have bought too many souvenirs you can also use them as an extra carry-on bag (and I’ve never been charged for it). My favourites are envirosax (Australian) and Loqi. They all have beautiful eye-catching designs too.
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